August 16, 2017

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY – NOVEMBER 10, 1775 – REMEMBER IT!

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY – NOVEMBER 10, 1775 – REMEMBER IT!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY MARINES!!!!!!!!
AMERICA COULDN’T HAVE STOOD FOR 233 YEARS WITHOUT YOU!!!!

Marine Corps, United States, one of the four armed services of the U.S. military.
Originally, its function was to supply guards to warships. Over the twentieth century,
however, the corps transformed into a multi-function organization that combines
ground and air combat units into a maritime force, trained to come from the sea to
fight on land (littoral warfare – of or pertaining to the shore of a lake, sea, or ocean.).

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

During the American Revolution, many important political discussions took place in
the inns and taverns of Philadelphia, including the founding of the Marine Corps.

A committee of the Continental Congress met at Tun Tavern to draft a resolution
calling for two battalions of Marines able to fight for independence at sea and on
shore.

The resolution was approved on November 10, 1775, officially forming the Continental
Marines.

As the first order of business, Samuel Nicholas became Commandant of the newly
formed Marines. Tun Tavern’s owner and popular patriot, Robert Mullan, became his
first captain and recruiter. They began gathering support and were ready for action by
early 1776.

THE THREE CORPS VALUES:
HONOR, COURAGE, COMMITMENT

Honor:  Honor requires each Marine to exemplify the ultimate standard in ethical and
moral conduct.  Honor is many things; honor requires many things.  A U.S. Marine
must never lie, never cheat, never steal, but that is not enough.  Much more is
required.  Each Marine must cling to an uncompromising code of personal integrity,
accountable for his actions and holding others accountable for theirs.  And, above all,
honor mandates that a Marine never sully the reputation of his Corps.

Courage:  Simply stated, courage is honor in action — and more.  Courage is moral
strength, the will to heed the inner voice of conscience, the will to do what is right
regardless of the conduct of others.  It is mental discipline, an adherence to a higher
standard.  Courage means willingness to take a stand for what is right in spite of
adverse consequences.  This courage, throughout the history of the Corps, has
sustained Marines during the chaos, perils, and hardships of combat.  And each day, it
enables each Marine to look in the mirror — and smile.

COMMITMENT:  Total dedication to Corps and Country.  Gung-ho Marine
teamwork.  All for one, one for all.  By whatever name or cliche, commitment is a
combination of (1) selfless determination and (2) a relentless dedication to
excellence.  Marines never give up, never give in, never willingly accept second
best.  Excellence is always the goal.  And, when their active duty days are over,
Marines remain reserve Marines, retired Marines, or Marine veterans.  There is no
such thing as an ex-Marine or former-Marine.  Once a Marine, always a
Marine.  Commitment never dies.

The three Corps Values: honor, courage, commitment.  They make up the bedrock of
the character of each individual Marine.  They are the foundation of his Corps.  These
three values, handed down from generation to generation, have made U.S. Marines
the Warrior Elite.  The U.S. Marine Corps: the most respected and revered fighting
force on earth.

THE MARINES’ HYMN
In 1929 The Marines’ Hymn became the official hymn of the Corps. Thirteen years later in November 1942 the Commandant approved a change in the words of the first verse, fourth line.Because of the increasing use of aircraft in the Corps, the words were changed to “In the air, on land, and sea.” No other changes have been made since that time. When you have attained absolute perfection, there is no need for further modification:
From the Halls of Montezuma,
To the Shores of Tripoli;
We fight our country’s battles
In the air, on land, and sea;
First to fight for right and freedom
And to keep our honor clean;
We are proud to claim the title
Of UNITED STATES MARINES.
Our flag’s unfurled to every breeze,
From dawn to setting sun;
We have fought in every clime and place
Where we could take a gun;
In the snow of far off northern lands
And in sunny tropic scenes;
You will find us always on the job —
The UNITED STATES MARINES.

MARINE HYMN: SUNG BY REAL AMERICANS – THOSE WHO CARE!

LISTEN TO THIS RENDITION – SEE ATTACHMENT.

THE MARINE CORPS MOTTO

The Marine Corps adopted Semper Fidelis as its official motto in 1883 (Semper Fidelis
is also the title of the official musical March of the Marine Corps).

Translated from Latin, Semper Fidelis means “Always Faithful.”  U.S. Marines use an
abbreviated verbal version, “Semper Fi,” to voice loyalty and commitment to their
Marine comrades-in-arms.

Previous mottos of the Marine Corps were:

(1) To the Shores of Tripoli, adopted in1805
(2) Fortitude, adopted in 1812
(3) From the Halls of Montezuma to the Shores of Tripoli, adopted in 1848
(4) By Sea and by Land, adopted in the 1850’s

USMC MASCOT

ENGLISH BULLDOGS.  Teufel-hunden.  Devil Dogs.  They symbolize the ethos of the
Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines.

USMC SLOGANS

1. First to Fight:  The media in the United States began using this term to describe U.S. Marines during World War I.  And, for once the media was right.  Marines have served in the vanguard of every American war since the founding of the Corps in 1775.  They have carried out over 300 assaults on foreign shores, from the arctic to the tropics.  Historically, U.S. Marines are indeed the first to fight.

2. Once a Marine, Always a Marine:  This truism is now the official motto of the
Marine Corps League.  The origin of the statement is credited to a gung-ho Marine
Corps master sergeant, Paul Woyshner.  During a barroom argument he shouted,
“Once a Marine, always a Marine!”  MSgt. Woyshner was right.  Once the title “U.S.
Marine” has been earned, it is retained.  There are no ex-Marines or former-
Marines.  There are (1) active duty Marines, (2) retired Marines, (3) reserve
Marines, and (4) Marine veterans.  Nonetheless, once one has earned the title, he
remains a Marine for life.

3.  Gung-Ho:  The Chinese used this term to describe Marines in China around 1900.
In the Chinese language, gung-ho means working together.  That’s what the
“American Marines” were always doing, “working together,” the Chinese
explained.  The term stuck to Marines like glue.  Today it conveys willingness to
tackle any task, or total commitment to the Corps.

4.  Good night, Chesty, wherever you are:  This is an often-used tribute of supreme
respect to the late and legendary LtGen. Lewis B. “Chesty” Puller, USMC.  Chesty!
Without a doubt he was the most outspoken Marine, the most famous Marine, the
Marine who really loved to fight, the most decorated Marine in the history of the
Corps.   Chesty enlisted as a Private.  Through incredible fortitude and tenacity he
became a living legend.  He shouted battle orders in a bellow and stalked
battlefields as though impervious to enemy fire.  Chesty rose to the rank of
Lieutenant General.  He displayed an abiding love for the Magnificent Grunts,
especially the junior enlisted men who did the majority of the sacrificing and dying,
and utter contempt for all staff pogues of whatever rank.  During his four wars, he
became the only Marine to be awarded the Navy Cross five times.  The Marines’
Marine!  “Goodnight, Chesty, wherever you are.”

5. A Few Good Men:  On 20 March 1779 in Boston, Capt. William Jones, USMC,
advertised for “a few good men” to enlist in the Corps for naval duty.  The term
seemed ideally suited for Marines, mainly because of the implication that “a few”
good men would be enough.  This term has survived for over 200 years and has
been synonymous with U.S. Marines ever since.

6.  “TEUFEL-HUNDEN,” MEANING DEVIL-DOGS:  During World War I, many official
German reports had called the attacking Marines “teufel-hunden,” meaning Devil-
Dogs.  These beasts were the ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.

USMC TERMS:
1.  Leatherneck: The nickname Leatherneck has become a universal moniker for a U.S. Marine. The term originated from the wide and stiff leather neck-piece that was part of the Marine Corps uniform from 1798 until 1872. This leather collar, called The Stock, was roughly four inches high and had two purposes. In combat, it protected the neck and jugular vein from cutlasses slashes. On parade, it kept a Marine’s head erect. The term is so widespread that it has become the name of the Marine Corps Association monthly magazine, LEATHERNECK.
2.  Gyrene: Around 1900, members of the U.S. Navy began using Gyrene as a jocular derogatory reference to U.S. Marines. Instead of being insulted, the Marines loved it. The term became common by World War I and has been extensively used since that time.
3.  Jarhead: For roughly 50 years, sailors had little luck in their effort to insult Marines by calling themGyrenes. So, during World War II sailors began referring to Marines as Jarheads. Presumably the high collar on the Marine Dress Blues uniform made a Marine’s head look like it was sticking out of the top of a Mason jar. Marines were not insulted. Instead, they embraced the new moniker as a term of utmost respect.
4.  “TEUFEL-HUNDEN,” MEANING DEVIL-DOGS: The German Army coined this term of respect for U.S. Marines during World War I.  In the summer of 1918 the German Army was driving toward Paris.  The French Army was in full retreat. In a desperate effort to save Paris, the newly arrived U.S. Marines were thrown into the breach.  In June 1918, in bitter fighting lasting for weeks, Marines repeatedly repulsed the Germans in Belleau Wood.  The German drive toward Paris sputtered, fizzled, and died.  Then the Marines attacked and swept the Germans back out of Belleau Wood. Paris had been saved.  The tide of war had turned. Five months later Germany would be forced to accept an armistice.  The battle tenacity and fury of the U.S. Marines had stunned the Germans.  In their official reports they called the Marines “teufel hunden,” meaning Devil Dogs, the ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.
5.  Soldiers of the Sea: A traditional and functional term for Marines, dating back to the British in the 1600’s.

SEMPER FI!